Call 911 for help and call a trusted friend, relative, or church leader.

Do not change your clothes (they will be needed for evidence), bathe, brush your teeth, or straighten up the assault area.

Go the emergency room of a hospital as soon as possible unless the police ask you to wait for them. In that case, they will escort you to the hospital. If you were raped in an unsafe area, let the police know.

When you arrive at the hospital, most likely an advocate from a sexual assault center will be there for you; you won’t be alone. Exams are important to detect injury and inform you of your options regarding pregnancy and protection from sexually transmitted diseases. The state will pay for your exam if police are notified.

Reporting the crime may make you eligible for compensation for medical/counseling costs or losses associated with the crime. Rape is a crime against the state.

Reporting the crime will also give you a sense of control, and the information you offer may help prevent the attacker from assaulting again.

Seek counseling, preferably with someone who works with sexual assault survivors.

Attend a sexual assault recovery support group. Ask if you church has one.

Call for information on rape crisis services in your community, or check your telephone directory, mental health clinics, local hospital, or police department. Some nonprofit mental health clinics and churches provide counseling for those unable to pay.

National Rape Crisis Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

Post the above information in public restrooms and on bulletin boards at places such as libraries, schools, stores and churches.